Socialized Health, Socialized Life

Second, politicians pass safety laws (or allow the bureaucracy to define and then enforce earlier laws) whose costs to the general public are not immediately perceptible. They may require automobile companies to install seat belts that buyers do not want to pay for, and which occupants subsequently refuse to use, but politicians are not about to pass a law that would impose fines on families for refusing to install smoke detectors in their own homes. The first piece of legislation would not gain the reprisal of voters; the second probably would. Third, because of the rise of State-financed health care, politicians can justify intrusions into the lives of citizens on this basis: “Because taxpayers must pay for injuries that are the result of carelessness, it is the responsibility of the State to force people to be more careful.” A good example of a compulsory personal safety law is the law requiring motorcyclists to wear crash helmets. Ina free market social order, if a cyclist sustains head injuries in a one-man crash, he hurts only himself. But because of the spread of socialized medicine, politicians can justify helmet laws politically. This line of reasoning can be used to pass almost any kind of safety legislation in the name of reducing potential accidents. Safety laws become in principle open-ended if their justification is the possible burden to taxpayers that an injury might produce. The socialization of health care can lead, step by step, to the socialization of all of life.

Gary North, Victim’s Rights

State health care — a core component of the messianic God-State “who will heal all your wounds, and will grant life onto you” — leads to the State-owned life.

Power-seeking idols need to be toppled: and, since Christians point-blank refuse to do so, God will do it Himself.

It’s going to be ugly. But, evil must be broken, regardless of the pain.

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