How the Church Can (and Should!) Care for the Unemployed

“…the question that I would like to get behind today is, if the civil government didn’t provide welfare, what would happen to the poor?”

Christians had better get themselves organized to answer this question with fine deeds, as well as fine words.

Because the day is coming, when the State will coolly wash it’s hand of it’s pretend-compassion, and focus on whats really important: protecting the power of the Banks and the Senior Politicos.

Leaving the unemployed, the sick, and the aged to their fate.

At least one decent battle plan to answer the headline question can be found from the Out of the Question Podcast (also available here, and here).

Also, check out the book In His Service: The Christian Calling to Charity.

The Christian faith once meant that a believer responded to a dark world by word and by deed. However, a modern, self-centered church has isolated the faith to a pietism that relinquishes charitable responsibility to the state. The end result has been the empowering of a humanistic world order.

In addition, God’s great and redeeming power is virtually limited to saving souls from eternal destruction. In Biblical terms, the priority if God’s Kingdom first, and all our acts of mercy and benevolence must be in terms of that grand mission. We are God’s servants – we dare not expect God to serve our needs ahead of His Kingdom.

It is now difficult for the church to recover the Biblical meaning of words like charity and compassion because post-World War II liberalism has redefined them politically into state welfarism. This redefinition has made charity a political tool to retain social order and made the state the primary agency of compassion. Charity is no longer personal.

But Biblical compassion flows from our having first received the grace of God and then manifesting it to others. Therefore, Biblical charity – which is compassion in action – is personal: it begins with God’s mercy towards us, and then the people of God give expression to that at an individual level. It is in His service that we understand out calling to charity.

In this book, Rushdoony elucidates the Christian’s calling to charity and its implications for godly dominion. In an age when Christian action is viewed in political terms, a return to Christian works of compassion and Godly service will help usher in a return of the reign of God as no piece of legislation ever could.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.