Suppressed Data and the Number of U.S. Deaths: 2019 and 2020

I was most interested in the snapshot of U.S. deaths that was flashed on the screen. Actual data and actual numbers can be a useful tool, or at least a starting point to figure out a problem.

So I went searching for it, and I looked for A Closer Look at U.S. Deaths Due to Covid-19, written by Yanni Gu for the john hopkins Newsletter.

The original article was replaced with text discouraging the unauthorized use of the information, but the gatekeeper did provide a link to the original article. You’ll have to go elsewhere to find a pointed comment under the article, though.

The comment is noted below:


Maxwell • a day ago
Consider the following figures- US Total deaths by year per CDC:

2013: 2,596,993
2014: 2,626,418
2015: 2,712,630
2016: 2,744,248
2017: 2,813,503
2018: 2,839,205
2019: 2,855,000
2020: as of 11/14 total deaths= 2,512,880

At present the US is experiencing a 1.12% increase in overall mortality rates for 2020- not good- pandemicky numbers to be sure. However, last year, 2019, there was also a 1.12% increase. Did we miss a pandemic in 2019?

But wait it’s even “scarier”- 2018 saw a 1.22% increase in mortality rates, 2017 saw a 1.24% increase, 2016 1.27% increase, 2015 1.27% increase, 2014 1.29% increase- all exceeding 2020’s increase in mortality rate– so does this mean we have had pandemics for the last 7 years?

Does this indicate non-stop pandemics every year for the last 7 years and we just weren’t paying attention and didn’t have an ‘honest” media to keep us pinned to our beds in a proper state of fear?

And BTW 2013 all the way back to 2009 all showed .09% increases in mortality rates– don’t know where the cutoff is but certainly even these years were “pandemic like” if you feel this year was truly a pandemic.

It isn’t until we go back to the year 2008 that we see a decrease in overall mortality rates in the US. For 20 straight years there were decreases in mortality rates and then in 2009 this changed- since then we have had an increase in mortality rates. Why is that? Could this point to the 2008 economic recession as being the leading indicator rather than some supernatural viral entity?

In reality this year at present seems to be no different in overall mortality rates compared to last year and less of an increase than 5 of the 6 the preceding years. How is this possible during a “pandemic of biblical proportions?”

It’s always important to look at the rates (populations are increasing and rates vary) and overall trends to get a clear picture.

It’s also been obvious since April that how death certificates are filed have been dramatically altered (first time in history) to give liberal interpretations to “Covid” as being cause of death- and let’s not forget that PCR tests at greater than 35 cycles (as is the case in virtually every lab in the US/Europe) produce massive false positives. This article illustrates indeed that past deaths caused by heart disease are now obviously getting lumped into the catch-all “Covid” category.

Oh and BTW the WHO changed it’s definition of what IS a Pandemic in 2009- might want to look into how and why that was done.


As the comment above notes, the raw number of deaths in the U.S. during the “plague year of 2020” is much the same as in 2019, 2018, 2017, etc.

There is not great plague. There is no biblical-scale pestilence striking the land.

There is only a nasty flu, that the elderly and the sickly should take precautions to avoid.

And the rest of us should get on with our lives.

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