Skeletons in the Closet

Russia’s Red Army invaded Poland in 1944, as Nazi Germany withdrew their soldiers. During that time, Soviet forces sought to seize control by suppressing Polish militia and religious figures, imprisoning, deporting and killing Polish soldiers, clergy and civilians. Records from 1945 documented Soviet soldiers slaughtering seven nuns in the order of St. Catherine of Alexandria, representatives of the Polish Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) told Live Science in an email.

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When the Germans began retreating from Poland in 1944, Russia seized the chance to take control of the country. “Mass terror ensued in the territory occupied by the Soviets,” according to the Warsaw Institute, a geopolitical think tank in Poland. As the Red Army advanced into cities and territories, soldiers looted and burned churches and religious buildings, and nuns were treated “with particular cruelty,” IPN representatives said. 

In February 1945, Russian forces descended upon hospitals in Gdańsk-Wrzeszcz, Olsztyn and Orneta, where nuns in the St. Catherine order served as nurses. Soldiers beat and stabbed patients and attacked the nuns who intervened, causing horrific injuries; Sister Rolanda’s face “was mutilated and swollen beyond recognition,” and Sister Gunhilda was shot three times, according to the IPN.

Sister Krzysztofora died after “a long fight with a Soviet soldier,” the IPN reported. At the time of her death, her eyes were gouged out, her tongue was cut off and she had been stabbed with a bayonet 16 times, according to the statement.

Skeletons of WWII-era nuns murdered by Soviets unearthed in Poland
by Mindy Weisberger – Senior Writer

Christians would be wise to remember how the Collectivists prefer to deal with them, given the opportunity.

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