Of Masters and Mistresses

(A slightly edited repost from the sci-fi blog)

The apostle Paul wrote: “And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression” (1 Timothy 2:14). Adam’s transgression was far more self-conscious then Eve’s was. Eve was operating from second-hand information about what God had said. Adam was not. Adam was operating from his own memory. Eve had only the memory of what Adam had told her that God had said. Eve had accurate knowledge. It was sufficient for her to make a judgment about the proper response to the serpent: a refusal to believe it and a refusal to eat. She did not have perfect information, but she had adequate information. She was therefore responsible. She had been deceived, but she should not have been deceived.

The Biblical Structure of History: Chapter 2, Image
Gary North

We don’t need perfect knowledge to make the right decision. We just need enough knowledge.

We need to have a grasp of what client/employer/father/commanding officer would want us to do, the basic principles and goals, and act in accordance to those goals.

Then, having been deceived, she lured her husband into transgression. He knew better. I believe that he was using her as an empirical test of God’s word. God had said that on the day that they ate from the tree, they would surely die. She had just eaten of it. Would she die or not? Was God’s word accurate or not? We do not know how long Adam waited to see whether his wife would die, but it is clear that he had already made up his mind regarding the reliability of God’s word. It was not absolute.

The Biblical Structure of History: Chapter 2, Image
Gary North

Most Noblewomen know full well that their Regal, Noble husbands would gladly put their life on the line – or just kill the woman themselves, up close and personal – if the possibility of more power and position for themselves arises as a result of the woman’s lifeblood on the floor. In general, the Noblewomen trust that the value of their birth-family’s friendship, coupled with a certain shared fondness, respect, and trust, will protect their lives.

Sometimes it does.

Sometimes it doesn’t.

Interestingly, Adam acted much like Traveller’s Grandfather, a notably intelligent, evil and vicious alien who valued the lives of his loved ones — the wife in Adam’s case, and the children in Grandfather’s case — as nothing, compared to his quest for knowledge and control. Grandfather disposed of his children and grandchildren as they were in the way of his experiments, while Adam decided to make the final call on whether God’s word was reliable, with Eve’s life as the perfectly acceptable price for power.

The servants of the serpent share a certain cruelly-cold, inhuman glint in the eye, regardless of species.

“But empirical experiments are the only true and reliable road to knowledge,” murmurs the finely scaled professionals.

To continue:

Then, having been deceived, she lured her husband into transgression. He knew better. I believe that he was using her as an empirical test of God’s word. God had said that on the day that they ate from the tree, they would surely die. She had just eaten of it. Would she die or not? Was God’s word accurate or not? We do not know how long Adam waited to see whether his wife would die, but it is clear that he had already made up his mind regarding the reliability of God’s word. It was not absolute. No one in his right mind would have risked death by violating the command of an absolute God. Adam assumed that his word was better than God’s word. In doing this, he assumed that his wife’s word was also better than God’s word. Therefore, he assumed that the serpent’s word was better than God’s word. He decided that he would be the judge between God and the serpent. He would determine who was telling the truth. He would decide whose word is reliable and whose word is not reliable.

The Biblical Structure of History: Chapter 2, Image
Gary North

“I will decide, via empirical experiment, if God is really speaking the truth. And if Eve, flesh of my flesh and bone of my bone, dies for it… her destruction is a perfectly acceptable price to pay for the satisfaction of my curiosity. Other women can always be created if needed, after all.”

Here was the historical setting of the great temptation. First, Satan had an agent: the serpent. The serpent spoke on behalf of Satan, in the same way that Eve spoke on behalf of Adam, and Adam had spoken on behalf of God. There is no indication that it was a fallen angel, let alone the supreme fallen angel. It was a beast of the field. “Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the Lord God had made” (Genesis 31a). This beast could talk. It spoke the same language that Adam and Eve spoke. It was able to communicate with Eve. It was able to argue with Eve. It had the power of logic. It had the power of observation. We might say that it had a very high IQ. But this high intelligence did it no good, for it was evil. As Van Til used to say, smart people who hate God are like buzz saws that are set at a crooked angle. It does not matter how sharp they are, they cannot cut straight.

[…]

What should Eve have done in response to the temptation? She could have picked up a stone and hit it in the head. She could have called on her husband to join her. Here was an invader of the garden. This invader was tempting her to revolt against the God who owned the garden. Because it tempted her to commit a capital crime, it deserved death. She had the lawful authority to impose this sanction. God had given mankind control over the beasts. She knew this because Adam had told her. God had spoken to her through her husband. The serpent was a beast. It was under her jurisdiction. By tempting her, it had risked death.

God imposed negative sanctions on Adam, Eve, and the serpent. They had all violated His sovereign word. There was a price to pay for rebellion. Adam and Eve either would impose negative sanctions on the serpent or else God would impose negative sanctions on all of them. The serpent was doomed either way: “damned if they did, damned if they didn’t.” This was the inescapable judicial price of becoming a covenantal agent of Satan.

The Biblical Structure of History: Chapter 2, Image
Gary North

Perhaps one day, we will have talking beasts once again.

I wonder what they would say.

Until then… the Eve’s of the world should notice that lethal force isn’t dependent on muscle mass anymore. Call it a little hint from Above.

Empirical experiments have built-in time restrictions. Reality doesn’t.

Beware of scaled advisors with their delicious promises of power.

And the Masters of the House should consider that Christ chose to die for His Bride. As opposed to using her corpse as a stepping stone to self-sufficient, autonomous power.

A diligent Christian should be confident in his ability to be a faithful steward in the area of knowledge, including historical knowledge. Paul offered this affirmation: “Or who hath known the mind of the Lord, that he may instruct him? but we have the mind of Christ” (1 Corinthians 2:16). Paul said “we.” This is a collective. It is basic to Christian civilization. Through the intellectual division of labor, Christians extend the kingdom of God in history. That is to say, they extend the civilization of God in history.

The Biblical Structure of History: Chapter 2, Image
Gary North

To him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood and made us a kingdom, priests to his God and Father, to him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.

Revelations 1:5b-6, English Standard Version

We continue to wait for noblemen worthy of the name.
As opposed to merely yapping about their power, their money, their bloodline, and their superior intelligence.

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